Tag Archives: battlefield leadership

Overcoming team, enterprise, and self analysis paralysis – Battlefield Leadership series

The Only Thing Wrong with Nothing Happening is the Fact that Nothing is Happening

A leader must be effective in the following tasks:

  • Invigorating a unit with disparate needs.
  • Managing time. There is always something a leader can do. Always.
  • Self confidence. Leaders must trust their instincts and previous experiences.
  • Innovation. When confronted with a situation different than planned, a leader needs to devise a new plan of attack.

The battle at Utah Beach demonstrates this with Roosevelt’s commands upon landing in the first wave. Roosevelt succeeded by leading the troops and deciding on the next actions quickly according to factors of the time.

Port en Bessin

Business Reflections…

As a leader of self, family, and business one must adopt these principles. The ability to positively effect these three factions is paramount to success. To succeed in life, one must adopt the following capabilities:

  1. Recognition of scenarios.
  2. Energy to execute.
  3. No hesitation, no analysis; paralysis avoidance.
  4. Foresight, having vision on the second step and continuing forward.
  5. Escaping the echo chamber of the mind and protocol.

 

What is Battlefield Leadership and what is this series about … 

As part of my pursuit to learn and grow, I sought out the excellent management training team at Battlefield Leadership. I am professionally leveraging this across multi-million dollar projects I am overseeing (currently I am the lead executive building global compliance and security programs specifically in the online services / cloud leader space). Personally I am bringing these lessons to bear within my pursuits to cross the chasm. To often I see brilliant technical individuals fail to communicate to very smart business leaders and to the common person on the street. My new book – How Not to be hacked seeks to be a first step in bringing deep information security practices beyond the technologist.

Most exciting the Battlefield group for this training placed it in Normandy France. This allowed for senior executives to be trained in a setting where serious decisions were placed by both sides, and each provided a lesson. This series represents my notes (that I could take down) and takeaways. I share to continue the conversation with those great individuals I met, and with the larger community.

Kind regards,

James

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A practitioner’s leadership behavior – Battlefield Leadership series: Pegasus Bridge

An interesting leadership insight found here is how Major Howard was recognized as an elite candidate and then promoted as a leader. He was promoted twice in only two months. This is especially interesting since he had a bias against him for not being part of the British Aristocracy. Throughout war time, Howard’s aggressive actions and leadership skills gained him full command of the unit (160 men).

Major Howard believed in being where the critical decisions were happening. As a leader he took the following actions:

  1. Be where the critical decisions are required.
  2. Be where the hardest tasks are happening (Major Howard lead the team for the toughest actions).
  3. Cross-training. Major Howard’s teams were trained and cross-trained on every objective and task.
  4. Rewarding “A” players. Major Howard was able to select the best of the best across the organization.
  5. Training and competitions to hone the skills of the team.
  6. Garnering his own experiences.
  7. Organizing athletic challenges. Howard required for the team to not only continue mental toughness but also physical agility.
  8. Leading by example. While Major Howard was not loved by many, he was respected by all.

Business Reflection Questions…

  • How are you building cross-functional teams?
  • How are you yourself learning skills and demonstrating ability to achieve objectives?
  • What are you accomplishing with teams?
  • How are the teams performing as a result of your leadership?
  • What marks of distinction do you and your team’s bear?
  • How are you making your team excel and treating the “A” players?

Basically… What is your competition, internally and externally, and how are you performing?


 

What is Battlefield Leadership and what is this series about … 

This is the third paper in this series. As part of my pursuit to learn and grow, I sought out the excellent management training team at Battlefield Leadership. I am professionally leveraging this across multi-million dollar projects I am overseeing (currently I am the lead executive building global compliance and security programs specifically in the online services / cloud leader space). Personally I am bringing these lessons to bear within my pursuits to cross the chasm. To often I see brilliant technical individuals fail to communicate to very smart business leaders and to the common person on the street. My new book – How Not to be hacked seeks to be a first step in bringing deep information security practices beyond the technologist.

Most exciting the Battlefield group for this training placed it in Normandy France. This allowed for senior executives to be trained in a setting where serious decisions were placed by both sides, and each provided a lesson. This series represents my notes (that I could take down) and takeaways. I share to continue the conversation with those great individuals I met, and with the larger community.

Kind regards,

James

Product development – Battlefield leadership series: WN60 – defensive positions by Germans at Omaha Beach

Leading up to the invasion of Normandy (read this book on the topic, 2 week perspective shifting emotional journey), the leaders of each side had differing ideas about when an invasion should and would occur. The Allies came to the conclusion of low to mid-tide times, and the Germans believed that that the Allies would prefer to invade during high-tide.

The Germans built obstacles around the Omaha Beach shore. They created mines throughout the beach that would be hidden during high tide. Based on gun placements along the cliffs, the Germans were confident that this would be ideal in protecting their own. After preparations were finished, the Germans had dozens of gun placements providing criss-crossing machine gun fire over the entirety of Omaha Beach. As history shows, the Allied casualty rate indicates exactly how successful these gun placements were.

In preparation for attack, the Allies took the opposite perspective. Low tide provided easy exit pathways later at high tide. Low tide also allowed the Allies to see the obstacles, carefully avoid them, and easily destroy them. During the battle, the removal of obstacles allowed for a continued steady landing of forces after the initial invasion.

The Allies won; they got Omaha Beach. They were able to exploit gaps in the German defensive strategy through the application of carefully planned actions.

Business Reflections…

In a free market world, there is always someone who sees an opportunity that others do not. The advantages to each opportunity are weighed and measured. The result can be great or completely opposite. During the invasion of Normandy, fire from the Germans required the infantry on the ground to adjust from the original plan (most Allied troops were landed in the wrong zones, without the equipment they needed, and the general leadership structure was fractured due to the loss of so many soldiers at the landing). This ability — the ability to go off course of the original plan in order to find success in the heat of battle — is crucial to businesses and their teams.

Leaders are not always on the ground and cannot be effective if the teams have to seek out answers prior to taking an initiative. The successful Allies learned from prior landings to implement the following (all applicable to businesses as well):

  1. Training, a lot of training. The troops were trained clearly, relentlessly, and aggressively. The training included hands-on challenges with similar landscape and environmental hurdles.
  2. Building culture. Teams, squads, packs, etc. of individuals were grouped together, in most cases, since enlisting. These groupings created mass cohesiveness and inspired troops to push themselves and their fellow soldiers further than they thought possible (as in the desire to ‘stand strong in front of their comrades’).
  3. Unit command – localized leadership and decision making allowed for the teams to respond, re-group, and deploy without micro-managed leadership (the Germans required authority to engage and move assets, and thus were to late in being effective in resisting the invasion force).

Leaders must consider how they are embracing the above, and how they have made themselves leaders instead of micro-managers with teams executing check-sheets. 


 

What is Battlefield Leadership and what is this series about … 

This is the second paper in this series. As part of my pursuit to learn and grow, I sought out the excellent management training team at Battlefield Leadership. I am professionally leveraging this across multi-million dollar projects I am overseeing (currently I am the lead executive building global compliance and security programs specifically in the online services / cloud leader space). Personally I am bringing these lessons to bear within my pursuits to cross the chasm. To often I see brilliant technical individuals fail to communicate to very smart business leaders and to the common person on the street. My new book – How Not to be hacked seeks to be a first step in bringing deep information security practices beyond the technologist.

Most exciting the Battlefield group for this training placed it in Normandy France. This allowed for senior executives to be trained in a setting where serious decisions were placed by both sides, and each provided a lesson. This series represents my notes (that I could take down) and takeaways. I share to continue the conversation with those great individuals I met, and with the larger community.

Kind regards,

James

 

 

 

Innovating and penetrating the market – Battlefield Leadership Series – lessons and thoughts

Longues Sur Mer

At this location on the coast of Normandy you can see the immense naval guns setup to attack oncoming ships in World War II. The Germans expended resources and relied heavily upon on these guns in their defensive strategy. Unfortunately for the Germans, the treatment of the workers and locals, the sheer lack of natural intelligence, and exposure of building such vast emplacements was their downfall.

The Allies often received intelligence on the exact positions of German construction. This was provided by those building and living in the area. Specifically, a local farmer boy who was blind and actually counted each step precisely and then supplied locations through the French resistance and Allied intelligence networks.

The result was a gap in the German defensive strategy, a waste of resources, and ultimately, a failure to defend the coast.

Business Reflections: Innovating and Penetrating the market…

  • How are you establishing a product development strategy and running your business as a whole?
  • Are there defensible attributes that you deem critical, and how can they be routed?

Practical example: In the information security and intellectual property sector, there are very real threats and running a secure business requires constant new methods of defense.  How have you reevaluated these based on the shifts internally of your business and the known threats in the market itself? How did this analysis compare to prior years, and how have the effectiveness of your defenses proven?

From a product innovation perspective – are you developing in features from the highest and lowest levels? What are the high impact:low development efforts underway, and what could be added. Product and innovation requires views on the long and short run – to often we make complexity because we are able to handle complexity, when sometimes the user really only needs something less complex.

Leadership requires action:

Simply acknowledging the risks and accepting the situation does not prevent disastrous outcomes.


 

What is Battlefield Leadership and what is this series about … 

As part of my pursuit to learn and grow, I sought out the excellent management training team at Battlefield Leadership. I am professionally leveraging this across multi-million dollar projects I am overseeing (currently I am the lead executive building global compliance and security programs specifically in the online services / cloud leader space). Personally I am bringing these lessons to bear within my pursuits to cross the chasm. To often I see brilliant technical individuals fail to communicate to very smart business leaders and to the common person on the street. My new bookHow Not to be hacked seeks to be a first step in bringing deep information security practices beyond the technologist.

Most exciting the Battlefield group for this training placed it in Normandy France. This allowed for senior executives to be trained in a setting where serious decisions were placed by both sides, and each provided a lesson. This series represents my notes (that I could take down) and takeaways. I share to continue the conversation with those great individuals I met, and with the larger community.

Kind regards,

James