The Enterprise Compliance and Security Game board

Questions that must be managed by the COO and CIO of every business relates to dedicating finite resources across the company. The products and services sold the by the business are developed and delivered to market as rapidly as possible in a race to be competitive. In the startup realm the concept of building in security, compliance, and privacy elements is very low priority. In most cases startups (and skunkworks within larger enterprises) depend upon the security of the libraries (ruby on rails, java libraries, etc…) and product components (UL Certified) to deliver security. Unfortunately depending upon the security and safety of the individual pieces is insufficient and inadequate when the elements (from here forward meant to refer to technology code and physical product components) are brought together in a new and non-obvious way. The emergence of these new products and services introduces dependencies, communication channels, new operating environments, and custom elements that reduce or eliminate the security-compliance-privacy elements that existed individually.

Leadership must then prioritize as immediately possible to introduce security-compliance-privacy. Companies certainly benefit by building these natively within the products and services at the Design & Build stage, as it is cheaper to build once then to re-design / re-code to meet the market expectation of security-compliance-privacy. The case when the organization must review its existing portfolio and decide what should be done, is the focus of this article. An analysis is necessary to evaluate the landscape of necessary and appropriate security-compliance-privacy requirements, and which products or services should be updated.

Or stated another way …

Where on the game board do the services and products of our company get prioritized to receive compliance, security, and privacy ‘attention’?

Such an analysis should at least include:

  1. Listing of all required regulations and business best practices
  2. Listing of all legal and contractual obligations
  3. Discovery of similar product / services in the market and list any requirements outlined resulting from litigation and similar government agency enforcement actions
  4. Strategic roadmap review – identify any likely near term requirements
  5. Listing of all requirements the individual products & services will be subject to from the customer’s perspective

At this point a robust listing exists on what the products and services should support. A cross-map of these requirements should then be produced for optimized adoption and sustained operation. The cross map will also provide the design specifications that will contribute to the use cases and product development life cycle.  An example of such is below:

Screen Shot 2013-01-09 at 4.01.26 PM

The above then (in sequence 1 to 5) are placed on your product / services game board and prioritization and risk management are possible. This is a process I designed in 2008 and have enhanced based on experience and client feedback building global security and compliance programs. Your program may need to consider additional facts and realities. I would love to hear your thoughts to enhance and challenge this method.

Best,

James DeLuccia

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